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DAY 10

DAY 10

MEET THE ULTIMATE SURVIVOR

The Tiger takes on multiple roles in operations around the world

Airbus’ pioneering progress helps address some of society’s most critical issues. From mobility, to climate change, to security, our technologies help build a better-connected, more prosperous and safer world.

That’s why more than 160 armed forces worldwide rely on Airbus helicopters to serve and protect lives.

In November 2014, the Tiger HAD (Hélicoptère d’Appui et Destruction) from the French Army Aviation (ALAT) was called upon by the UN to support its troops keeping peace in the Central African Republic.

Peacekeeping operations are often particularly demanding, and require an aircraft with adaptability, manoeuvrability, range and discretion. 

On top of this, Operation Sangaris took place in a tough tropical climate: temperatures in excess of 30oC, humidity levels as high as 70% and significant dust.

The Tiger HAD proved it was up to the challenge. Having operated at altitude in Afghanistan and in drought conditions in Mali, it is practised at developing new skills to meet demanding conditions.

The heavy-duty helicopter is able to stay in the air for nearly four hours, even with the largest of loads. That enabled it to zig zag the region day and night, whatever the conditions, to reliably transfer vital mission information to troops on the ground. 

The Tiger is also, crucially, maintainable in the field by design. This meant that just two Tiger HAD helicopters were necessary for the mission with only a lean support team. 

Yet for all these features, sometimes the mere presence of a helicopter is enough to protect peace. Not a single missile was fired during Operation Sangaris – as the Tiger showed its strength without ever having to use it.


Did you know...

More than 160 armed forces worldwide rely on Airbus helicopters to serve and protect lives.

The Tiger HAD features a 13-metre, four-bladed hingeless main rotor

The Tiger HAD has a cruise speed of 271 km/h

The Tiger HAD has a maximum range of 740km

The Tiger HAD’s tandem-seat glass cockpit layout means it can carry one pilot in the front seat, and one aircraft commander in the rear seat

The Tiger HAD can be used day and night, thanks to its powerful sensors

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