Turkish Airlines orders another 13 Airbus aircraft

Turkish Airlines orders another 13 Airbus aircraft

Further endorsement for efficient, reliable, profitable Airbus aircraft family

8 March 2011 Press Release

Turkish Airlines has signed a firm order for the purchase of ten Airbus A321s and three A330-200F freighter aircraft to meet their growth plans in the passenger and cargo markets. The airline has a further 27 aircraft on order with Airbus from contracts placed in 2009 and 2010.

The new aircraft will join Turkish Airlines’ existing fleet of 75 Airbus aircraft, including four A310 freighters, 50 A320 Family aircraft, 11 A330s, one A330-200F and nine A340s.

“To achieve our ambitious expansion plans in a sustainable and profitable manner, we require a reliable and efficient fleet,” said Dr Temel Kotil, CEO of Turkish Airlines.  “Our positive experience with our in service A320 fleet and the outstanding flexibility and efficiency demonstrated by our A330-200F since it entered service last year made these repeat orders the logical choice for our growth.”

“Airbus offers the most modern and eco-efficient aircraft available on the market, and our unique operational commonality allows our customers to achieve maximum productivity from their fleets,” said John Leahy Airbus Chief Operating Officer, Customers. “We are delighted that Turkish Airlines, the fastest growing airline in Europe, has again chosen Airbus as a partner for their growth.”

Airbus is the leading aircraft manufacturer with the most modern and comprehensive family of airliners on the market, ranging in capacity from 100 to more than 500 seats. Airbus aircraft share a unique cockpit and operational commonality, allowing airlines to use the same pool of pilots, cabin crews and maintenance engineers, bringing operational flexibility and resulting in significant cost savings.

Airbus has sold over 10,000 aircraft and delivered over 6,500 since its first airliner entered service in 1974.  Airbus aircraft are in service with more than 430 customers and operators around the world.