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02 March 2017
Commercial Aircraft

Airbus’ A350-1000 shows off its cold weather capabilities under the Northern Lights

A350-1000_Aurora Borealis
A350-1000_Aurora Borealis AIRBUS, RAMADIER Sylvain
27 February 2017

A350-1000_Aurora Borealis

The A350-1000 has a spectacular view of Aurora Borealis during its cold weather testing in Iqaluit, Canada

The latest member of Airbus’ all-new A350 XWB widebody family has undergone rigorous ground and flight tests in the extreme operating conditions of Iqaluit, Canada – which provided a picturesque backdrop accentuated by the Northern Lights. 
Iqaluit, a Canadian territory with a polar climate caused by the Labrador Current, allows Airbus’ longest-fuselage A350-1000 version to face-off against one of the most challenging environments for an aircraft. The jetliner successfully completed five days of intensive testing at an outside air temperature (OAT) that fluctuated between -28 degrees and -37 degrees Celsius. 
Emanuele Costanzo, Flight Test Engineer at Airbus, said of the results: “The A350-1000 has responded successfully to the ground and flight tests performed in the freezing temperatures of Iqaluit – which demonstrates the already proven maturity and reliability of the A350 XWB.” 
All three A350-1000 flight test aircraft have been engaged in the type certification campaign. These latest tests come three years after the A350-1000’s sister – the A350-900 – successfully overcame the uniquely challenging environment in Iqaluit, Canada.

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A350-1000_Aurora Borealis  
27 February 2017 Livery

The A350-1000 has a spectacular view of Aurora Borealis during its cold weather testing in Iqaluit, Canada

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