Airbus corporate jet is exhibited in Australia for first time

Highlights widest and tallest cabin of any business jet

11 February 2013 Press Release

An Airbus corporate jet is being exhibited in Australia for the first time, giving potential customers the opportunity to experience the widest and tallest cabin of any business jet.

The aircraft, an Airbus ACJ319 operated by VVIP charter company Comlux, is being shown at the Australian International Airshow from 26th to 28th February. Its cabin is furnished like an upmarket office and home, with workspaces, lounge areas, bedrooms and bathrooms that capitalise on the unequalled comfort and space that Airbus corporate jets offer.

“When it comes to business jets it’s the cabin that counts, because the more you fly the more important comfort becomes, and Airbus corporate jets are the ultimate in comfort,” comments Airbus Chief Operating Officer, Customers, John Leahy.

Airbus corporate jets are derived from the world’s most modern airliner family, giving them excellent efficiency and robust reliability, as well as making them an interesting investment of proven value. They have won more than 170 sales, and are flying on every continent, including Antarctica.

Business jet customers comprise companies, individuals and governments, and Airbus corporate jets are available to meet the needs of all of them. The Airbus corporate jet family ranges from the ACJ318 all the way up to the ACJ380, allowing customers to gain the comfort that they want in the size that they need.

So whether customers want to conduct business with colleagues while travelling, to fly friends and family on vacation, or to transport a government delegation abroad, Airbus corporate jets are unmatched in what they offer.

Unlike traditional business jets, Airbus corporate jets can also carry larger groups – such as an entire government delegation - as well as providing more room on board.

Airbus corporate jet customers in Asia-Pacific include Australian company Skytraders, which flies an Airbus ACJ319 on charter flights, including the ferrying of scientists and their equipment to and from Antarctica.

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