Airbus Bio-Index survey shows more can be done to educate U.S. children about nature

Airbus Bio-Index survey shows more can be done to educate U.S. children about nature

As part of its ongoing support of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity and the Green Wave, Airbus conducted an international survey of young people - revealing American youth prefer TV watching to saving the environment.

19 May 2010 Feature story

The results of the Airbus Bio-Index – a survey of over 10,000 children and young people worldwide – reveals that further effort is needed to inform and empower a future generation of environmental champions. 

According to the survey, just four percent of young people in the United States rank saving the environment as ‘most important’ to them, compared with 39 percent for watching TV or playing computer games. Forty-one percent of American youth surveyed report saving the environment was ‘least important’ to them, higher than the global average of 32 percent.

Sponsored by Airbus on behalf of the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Bio-Index was conducted across 10 countries – France, Germany, Spain, Japan, China, Mexico, Singapore, Australia, the U.K. and the U.S. A sample of 1,000 five to18-year-olds were taken from each participating nation.

The survey was conducted as part of Airbus’ ongoing work with the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity and support of the Green Wave. This initiative – part of the International Year of Biodiversity – is designed to educate young people about the vital role biodiversity plays in our lives and futures.

On a positive note, the results show that children in the U.S. still enjoy spending time outdoors, with over half (52 percent) saying it is their favorite pastime – well above the global average of 30 percent.

Biodiversity is high on the global agenda. The latest United Nations report – the third Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO-3) – warns that natural systems that support economies, lives and livelihoods across the planet are at risk of rapid degradation and collapse unless there is swift action to conserve and sustainably use the variety of life on Earth.

View more results from the Airbus Bio-Index by country.

Twitter feed